Scientific Publications

ILSI Europe disseminates science by publishing articles on original research, literature reviews and gap analyses, and meeting proceedings in peer-reviewed journals.  ILSI Europe also publishes books, monographs, white papers, and other reports.

Journal Articles

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Prebiotics

GUT MICROBIOME AND HEALTH

Together with proteins and fats, carbohydrates are one of the macronutrients in the human diet. Digestible carbohydrates, such as starch, starch-based products, sucrose, lactose, glucose and some sugar alcohols and unusual (and fairly rare) α-linked glucans, directly provide us with energy while other carbohydrates including high molecular weight polysaccharides, mainly from plant cell walls, provide us with dietary fibre. Carbohydrates which are efficiently digested in the small intestine are not available in appreciable quantities to act as substrates for gut bacteria. Some oligo- and polysaccharides, many of which are also dietary fibres, are resistant to digestion in the small intestines and enter the colon where they provide substrates for the complex bacterial ecosystem that resides there. This review will focus on these non-digestible carbohydrates (NDC) and examine their impact on the gut microbiota and their physiological impact. Of particular focus will be the potential of non-digestible carbohydrates to act as prebiotics, but the review will also evaluate direct effects of NDC on human cells and systems

Keywords Expand

Prebiotics, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), non-digestible carbohydrates

To download this open-access article, please click here.

This work was commissioned by the Prebiotics Task Force.

[post_title] => Structure and function of non-digestible carbohydrates in the gut microbiome [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => structure-and-function-of-non-digestible-carbohydrates-in-the-gut-microbiome [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-07-04 13:16:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-07-04 13:16:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://ilsi.eu/?post_type=publication&p=11188 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publication [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 11103 [post_author] => 24 [post_date] => 2022-06-29 09:16:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-06-29 09:16:43 [post_content] =>

Nutrient Intake Optimisation

Adequate iodine intake is essential throughout life. Key dietary sources are iodized salt and animal products, but dietary patterns in Europe are changing, for example toward lower salt intake and a more plant-based diet.

The objective of this systematic review was to review iodine intake (not status) in European populations (adults, children, and pregnant women) to identify at-risk groups and dietary sources. In total, 57 studies were included, comprising 22 national surveys and 35 sub-national studies. Iodine intake data were available from national surveys of children aged <10 years (n = 11), 11-17 years (n = 12), and adults (n = 15), but data from pregnancy were only available from sub-national studies.

We show that iodine intake data are lacking-only 17 of 45 (38%) European countries had iodine-intake data from national surveys. Iodine intake reported from national surveys was below recommendations for: (1) children aged <10 years in 2 surveys (18%), (2) boys and girls aged 11-17 years in 6 (50%) and 8 (68%) surveys, respectively, and (3) adult men and women in 7 (47%) and 12 (80%) surveys, respectively. In pregnant women, intake was below recommendations except where women were taking iodine-containing supplements. Just 32% of national surveys (n = 7) included iodized salt when estimating iodine intake. Milk, dairy products, fish, and eggs were important contributors to intake in many countries, suggesting limited sources in plant-based diets.

Results are limited by the challenges of dietary assessment for measuring iodine intake. Future national surveys should include iodine intake. Policy makers should consider dietary sources alongside any iodized salt policies when considering methods for improving population iodine intake.

Keywords Expand

Adults, children, diet, Europe, fish, iodized, iodine, intake, milk, pregnancy

To download this open-access article, please click here.

This work was commissioned by the Nutrient Intake Optimisation Task Force.
[post_title] => A systematic review of iodine intake in children, adults, and pregnant women in Europe - comparison against dietary recommendations and evaluation of dietary iodine sources [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-systematic-review-of-iodine-intake-in-children-adults-and-pregnant-women-in-europe-comparison-against-dietary-recommendations-and-evaluation-of-dietary-iodine-sources [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-07-04 10:32:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-07-04 10:32:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://ilsi.eu/?post_type=publication&p=11103 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publication [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10886 [post_author] => 24 [post_date] => 2022-05-30 07:04:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-30 07:04:45 [post_content] =>

Obesity and Diabetes

Nutrition Security and Societal Aspects

Background: The gold-standard techniques for measuring insulin sensitivity and secretion are well established. However, they may be perceived as invasive and expensive for use in dietary intervention studies. Thus, surrogate markers have been proposed as alternative markers for insulin sensitivity and secretion. This systematic review aimed to identify markers of insulin sensitivity and secretion in response to dietary intervention and assess their suitability as surrogates for the gold-standard methodology. Methods: Three databases, PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane were searched, intervention studies and randomised controlled trials reporting data on dietary intake, a gold standard of analysis of insulin sensitivity (either euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp or intravenous glucose tolerance test and secretion (acute insulin response to glucose), as well as surrogate markers for insulin sensitivity (either fasting insulin, area under the curve oral glucose tolerance tests and HOMA-IR) and insulin secretion (disposition index), were selected. Results: We identified thirty-five studies that were eligible for inclusion. We found insufficient evidence to predict insulin sensitivity and secretion with surrogate markers when compared to gold standards in nutritional intervention studies. Conclusions: Future research is needed to investigate if surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity and secretion can be repeatable and reproducible in the same way as gold standards.

Keywords Expand

Insulin Sensitivity; Insulin Secretion; Gold Standard; Surrogate Markers; Dietary Intervention Studies

To download this open-access article, please click here.

This work was commissioned by the Obesity and Diabetes Task Force.

[post_title] => The Use and Effectiveness of Selected Alternative Markers for Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Compared with Gold Standard Markers in Dietary Intervention Studies in Individuals without Diabetes: Results of a Systematic Review [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-use-and-effectiveness-of-selected-alternative-markers-for-insulin-sensitivity-and-secretion-compared-with-gold-standard-markers-in-dietary-intervention-studies-in-individuals-without-diabetes-res [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-05-31 09:10:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-05-31 09:10:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://ilsi.eu/?post_type=publication&p=10886 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => publication [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 10921 [post_author] => 24 [post_date] => 2022-05-31 08:54:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2022-05-31 08:54:54 [post_content] =>

Alternatives to Animal Testing in Food Safety, Nutrition and Efficacy Studies

NEW APPROACHES FOR FOOD SAFETY

Background: Methods and approaches that can be used in food and nutrition research are changing at a faster pace than ever. Whereas animal methods are mostly known for their use in food safety analysis (see Part I), they also play in important role in proof-of-concept and mechanistic studies of products, as well as studying potency, efficacy, and tolerance of foods and food ingredients. Members of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Europe have formed an expert group to review possibilities, opportunities, and challenges for the potential use of alternative testing strategies in nutrition research and regulatory requirements, supporting the 3Rs principle of Replacement, Reduction, Refinement of animal research, which can ultimately be used in support of regulatory submissions for pre-market authorisation.
Scope and approach: For the different areas of food for specific groups and health claims, the acceptability of non-animal approaches is evaluated in comparison to legislative requirements in Europe. The alternative approaches considered cover emerging tools and methodologies such as organoids, organs-on-a-chip or human in vitro gastrointestinal simulators.
Conclusions: In nutrition research, there has been a long tradition of following a certain experimental trajectory for grounding scientific hypotheses starting from in vitro data moving on to in vivo verification in a preferred animal model and finally proving this in a human setting. From a regulatory perspective there is no specific requirement for animal experimentation that justifies the use of the majority of animal experiments in the
assessment of nutritional content and value of food products. However, animal data are mostly considered as the standard, and guidance for alternative approaches that would be accepted is lacking. It is therefore important to further build evidence and offer validation for the adequacy of already existing in vitro tools to ensure their suitability for substantiating dose levels and further planning clinical trials. What are we waiting for? Keywords Expand

Non-animal testing, Nutrition research, Regulation

To download this open-access article, please click here.

This work was commissioned by the Alternatives to Animal Testing in Food Safety, Nutrition and Efficacy Studies Task Force.

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Food Allergy Task Force

NEW APPROACHES FOR FOOD SAFETY

Quantitative risk assessment (QRA) for allergens exists in many different forms with different requirements placed on the risk assessor depending on the question that needs to be answered. An electronic workshop held in October 2020 and comprising representatives from a wide range of food allergy and allergen stakeholder groups identified that a summary of current best in class guidance, identified gaps, potential improvements & harmonization of allergen QRA arising largely from cross contact would be very beneficial. The current manuscript provides an introduction to allergen QRA and an overview of inputs potentially needed for different QRA methods, when deemed feasible and necessary. It also introduces the European branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI Europe) Expert Group (EG), created to attempt to achieve consensus on the methodologies needed for allergen QRAs by food business operators, and their implementation. Areas of focus include proactive assessments for food production under normal conditions, both in the upstream supply chain and in food production facilities, and reactive assessments as part of an allergen incident response. As a follow-up report to the October 2020 electronic workshop, the current manuscript provides an overview of allergen QRA and insights into the guidance being developed. This manuscript will itself be followed by more detailed guidance for allergen QRA published open access as an ILSI Europe report.

Link to download the full-text

Keywords Expand

Allergens; Quantitative risk assessment (QRA); Supply chain; Incidents; Cross-contact; Precautionary allergen labelling (PAL)

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Prebiotics

GUT MICROBIOME AND HEALTH

Together with proteins and fats, carbohydrates are one of the macronutrients in the human diet. Digestible carbohydrates, such as starch, starch-based products, sucrose, lactose, glucose and some sugar alcohols and unusual (and fairly rare) α-linked glucans, directly provide us with energy while other carbohydrates including high molecular weight polysaccharides, mainly from plant cell walls, provide us with dietary fibre. Carbohydrates which are efficiently digested in the small intestine are not available in appreciable quantities to act as substrates for gut bacteria. Some oligo- and polysaccharides, many of which are also dietary fibres, are resistant to digestion in the small intestines and enter the colon where they provide substrates for the complex bacterial ecosystem that resides there. This review will focus on these non-digestible carbohydrates (NDC) and examine their impact on the gut microbiota and their physiological impact. Of particular focus will be the potential of non-digestible carbohydrates to act as prebiotics, but the review will also evaluate direct effects of NDC on human cells and systems

Keywords Expand

Prebiotics, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), non-digestible carbohydrates

To download this open-access article, please click here.

This work was commissioned by the Prebiotics Task Force.

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